Deep Fried Turkey Safety Tips

Char-Broil Easy Turkey Fryer

It’s hard to believe that it’s already that time of the year already.  However given that I waited until Veterans Day to winterize my boat should make it is obvious that I have been attempting  to deny the holiday season is already here but to deny it at this stage would be cause for a thorough head examination!

If you live in North Carolina your plans for Thanksgiving Day celebrations might invariably include the fine Southern tradition of Deep Fried Turkey. So when I got the email from my local U-Haul dealer thanking me for being a “loyal U-Haul customer this year” and the subject read “Oil-Less Propane Turkey Fryers at U-Haul for Thanksgivng” (typo included) it got me thinking about a conversation I had last year with my friend Don Fuller who happens to be my North Carolina Farm Bureau Agent.

Don tells me that nearly ALL Thanksgiving Day homeowner’s insurance claims almost always involve a deep fryer and a raw/frozen turkey. I dug up a press release from North Carolina Farm Bureau dated November 25, 2008 and thought I would share with my readers  important safety tips that you should know about if you are planning to Deep Fry a Turkey this Thanksgiving.

Farm Bureau Insurance urges anyone planning to use a turkey fryer this holiday season to keep in mind the following safety tips provided by Underwriting Laboratories, (UL):

  • Turkey fryers should be used outdoors a safe distance from buildings and other material that can burn.
  • Make sure the fryers are used on a flat surface to reduce accidental tipping.
  • Never let children or pets near the fryer when in use. Even after use, never allow them near the turkey fryer. The oil inside can remain dangerously hot, hours after use.
  • To avoid oil spillover, do not overfill the fryer.
  • Be careful with marinades. Oil and water don’t mix, and water causes oil to spill over, causing fire or even an explosion hazard.
  • Keep an all-purpose fire extinguisher nearby. Never use water to extinguish a grease fire.
The cardinal rule with turkey fryers is to never leave it unattended,” says Jimmy Maass, safety coordinator at Virginia Farm Bureau. “Many dangers associated with turkey fryers are due to consumer misuse or inattentiveness, and really, it is a two-person job. To prevent the risk of a tip over, overheating, or spilling hot oil that could lead to fire and severe burns, it’s important that turkey fryers be used under close supervision and with extreme caution.”

Finally, keep in mind that while using a turkey fryer can be a fun and tasty way to prepare your holiday meal. Safety organizations including the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) and the American Burn Association (ABA) discourage the use of turkey fryers, along with Underwriting Laboratories (UL). Don’t be mislead by some packaging, there may be parts to a turkey fryer that are UL certified, but not the entire appliance.

“Based on our test findings, the fryers used to produce those great tasting birds are not worth the risks. And, as a result of these tests, UL has decided not to certify any turkey fryers with our trusted UL Mark,” said John Drengenberg, Consumer Affairs Manager with UL.

If after all of those warnings you still plan to deep-fry your Thanksgiving Day Turkey U-Haul has two OIL-LESS TURKEY FRYERS made by Charbroil for sale in their online store, no expensive oil, still great deep-fried taste, and much safer.  Check it out for yourself and let me know what you decide. If you have cooking and safety tips of your own please share them with my readers.

0 thoughts on “Deep Fried Turkey Safety Tips”

  1. This is an excellent article, but the last 3 paragraphs are probably the most important part. Now I remember why I love fixing my turkey in the crock pot. Yes, the meat browns beautifully and the stock is fantastic for gravy.

  2. I love deep fried turkey as well; unfortunately I don’t have anywhere safe to cook one. The other issue for me is that I absolutely LOVE gravy with turkey and the only way I know to make gravy without the turkey juices is a white wine sauce, which uses a whole carton of heavy cream. Neither my waistline or coronary arteries need the cream!!

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